This Couple’s Home Is Two Houses In One!

This Couple’s Home Is Two Houses In One!

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This Couple’s Home Is Two Houses In One!

Architecture

by Amelia Barnes

‘His and hers’ wings characterise this Mornington Peninsula home.  Photo – Shannon McGrath

Spotted gum cladding was chosen for its fire-resistance and sustainability. Photo – Shannon McGrath

The wings frame the entry upon arrival, followed by a central courtyard, before converging at the rear of the property opening onto a shared living area and a north-facing garden.  Photo – Shannon McGrath

The central courtyard is glazed on all four sides to varying degrees, offering glimpses of light and green from all corners, including his study. Photo – Shannon McGrath

White concrete floors line the home. Photo – Shannon McGrath

The kitchen sits in the rear, communal area. Photo – Shannon McGrath

The ‘his’ wing is smaller, clad in dark charcoal, and cosier than its counterpart. Artwork by Jock Clutterbuck. Photo – Shannon McGrath

The entire home was designed with consideration of the clients ageing comfortably in place, hence the single-level floor plan. Photo – Shannon McGrath

Garden areas are native and therefore easily maintainable, and can be appreciated internally from almost every room. Photo – Shannon McGrath

Retractable fly screens allow the the entire rear of the house to receive fresh air. Photo – Shannon McGrath

Each bathroom is custom designed to the user. Photo – Shannon McGrath

One bath is light-filled with an inbuilt bench seat and skylight, the other has a sunken bath and a green outlook with glazed wall to a private garden. Photo – Shannon McGrath

The large pivot front door is painted in the female client’s favourite colour, fuchsia.  Photo – Shannon McGrath

The clients of this project have lived together for over 50 years! Photo – Shannon McGrath

‘We were effectively designing two individual houses linked by a  ‘together space’,’ says architect Rosa Coy. 

Photo – Shannon McGrath

‘Essentially two houses in one’ is how Rosa Coy, architect and director at Coy Yiontis Architects, describes this Mornington Peninsula project. Titled ‘Seawind’, the house was designed for a couple of over 50 years, looking to live their best life in retirement.

Rather than compromising on details (as is generally required in relationships!), the house features two defined wings, providing each partner with their own personalised space. These two wings frame the home’s entrance, followed by a central courtyard, before converging in a shared living area. 

The two wings not only support each partner’s way of life (for example, one bathroom has an inbuilt bench seat and skylight, while the other has a sunken bath and garden view), but have their own material palettes. Rosa describes the ‘hers’ wing as being more prominent, airy, and clad in white steel, while the ‘his’ wing is smaller, clad in dark charcoal steel, and cosy.

Featured materials of the project include white concrete floors, spotted gum cladding for fire-resistance and sustainability, and marble tiles for practicality and ambience. ‘They reminded the clients of a home in a previous life overseas,’ says Rosa of the marble.

The entire home has been designed with consideration of ageing comfortably in place, hence the single-level floor plan. Garden areas are native and therefore easily maintainable, and can be appreciated internally from almost every room. 

‘The home is fundamentally liveable and carefully considered with regard to the idiosyncrasies of the couple that live here,’ Rosa says.